search archive
browse archive

22499 total results

163 results after applying filter

In complete archive


Title
Description
Date

Oral history.; Interview conducted March 11, 2003. Joseph Stephen Zuccaro Jr. was born November 24, 1923, in Natchez, Mississippi. In 1941, Zuccaro graduated from St. Joseph's High School in Natchez. He volunteered for service in World War II, joining the Marine Corps at the age of nineteen. He later attended the University of Mississippi School of Law, earned his JD degree in 1949 and began practicing law in Natchez. He was attorney for the Natchez mayor and Board of Aldermen, attorney for the Adams County Board of Supervisors, and also for the Claiborne County Board of Supervisors. He represented the Board of Trustees of Natchez Regional Medical Center, served as Chancery Judge for the counties of Claiborne, Jefferson, Adams, and Wilkinson, and served as a Justice of the Mississippi State Supreme Court from 1987 to 1989. In addition, he served as member and chair of the Mississippi Oil and Gas Board.

2003-03-11

Oral history.; Reuben V. Anderson was born in Jackson, Mississippi in 1942. As a student Anderson excelled academically and athletically, ultimately earning an athletic scholarship to Tougaloo College. At Tougaloo, Anderson met many people who influenced his life and career, including professor Ernst Borinski, and civil rights leader, Ed King. He was involved with the desegregation of the Jackson Public Library. He was the first African American to graduate from the University of Mississippi Law School. After graduation, he began practicing civil rights law. He was successful at overseeing the integration of the schools in Mississippi. Anderson was drafted during the conflict in Vietnam, but his service to the Legal Defense Fund helped him to earn a draft deferment to stay in the United States and practice law. Mayor Russell C. Davis appointed Anderson to serve as the first African American municipal court judge, and he was later appointed to Hinds County Court (by Gov. Cliff Finch) and 7th Circuit Court (by Gov. William Winter). He eventually came to the Mississippi Supreme Court, where he served from 1985-1990. After retiring from the Court, Anderson returned to private practice and resumed his involvement with the business sector. Judge Anderson is married to Phyllis Wright Anderson, and has three children.

2003-03-04

Oral history.; Interview conducted September 11, 2002 with Lenore Prather. Lenore Loving Prather was born September 17, 1931. Prather attended Mississippi State College for Women, where she received her bachelor of science in 1953. She then attended the University of Mississippi School of Law, receiving her Juris Doctorate in 1955. After earning her degree, Prather was admitted to practice law in 1955. She served as West Point municipal judge from 1965 to 1971. During this time, Prather also taught classes at Mississippi State University. She served as Fourteenth District Chancery Judge from 1972 to 1982. Prather was then appointed to the Mississippi State Supreme Court by Governor William Winter, having the distinction of being Mississippi's first female justice. During her tenure on the supreme court, Prather became presiding justice in 1993 and chief justice in 1998. She served on the supreme court until 2000.

2002-09-11

Oral history.; Interview conducted October 10, 2002 with Michael Mills. Michael P. Mills was born on August 25, 1956, in Charleston, South Carolina. He received a BA from the University of Mississippi, a JD from the University of Mississippi School of Law, and an LLM from the University of Virginia School of Law. From 1984 to 1995, he was a member of the Mississippi House of Representatives. In 1995, he was appointed to the Mississippi Supreme Court by Governor Kirk Fordice. In 1997, he wrote the majority opinion affirming the conviction of Byron de la Beckwith for the 1963 murder of civil rights leader Medgar Evers. Mills was appointed a judge to the federal district court of the Northern District of Mississippi in 2001 by President George W. Bush. In this appointment, he served as chief judge from 2007 to the present.

2002-10-10

Oral history.; Born in Clinton, Mississippi in 1917, both of William Joel Blass' parents were teachers and his father was also a Baptist minister. Blass attended East Mississippi Junior College and Pearl River Junior College. He earned his AB and LLB degrees from Louisiana State University. As a lawyer in 1952, he successfully prosecuted the Boyce Holleman case by proving that voter fraud had kept Holleman from winning. Beginning in 1953, he served two terms in Stone County's legislative seat, retiring from that position in 1960. While in office, most considered him an extreme liberal on racial issues and he endured vigorous, hostile attacks on his reputation by both private citizens and state legislators. Former Gov. Ray Mabus appointed Blass to a vacancy on the Mississippi Supreme Court in 1989. He served through December 1990. He was defeated in his election bid by Justice Chuck McRae.

2002-09-07; 2002-09-08

Oral history.; Dan M. Lee was born in Petal, Mississippi, on April 19, 1926. He graduated from Petal High School in April 1944. Justice Lee served in the United States Naval Air Corps from April 1944 to June 1946. Lee attended pre-law at The University of Southern Mississippi, and he obtained his LLB degree in 1949 and his JD in 1970, both from the Mississippi College School of Law. Lee was admitted to the Mississippi Bar in 1948 and engaged in private practice with J. Ed Franklin from 1948 to 1954. From 1954 to 1971, he practiced law as a member of the firm of Lee, Moore and Countiss. Lee was elected and served as Hinds County Judge from 1971 to 1977 and as Circuit Judge of Hinds and Yazoo Counties from 1977 to 1982. In 1980, he was elected Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court for a term beginning in 1982 and was re-elected in 1988 for an eight-year term commencing January 1, 1990. He served as presiding justice from 1987 until December 1, 1995 when he became Chief Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court.

2003-02-05; 2003-02-11; 2003-02-12

Oral history.; Born in Clinton, Mississippi in 1917, both of William Joel Blass' parents were teachers and his father was also a Baptist minister. Blass attended East Mississippi Junior College and Pearl River Junior College. He earned his AB and LLB degrees from Louisiana State University. As a lawyer in 1952, he successfully prosecuted the Boyce Holleman case by proving that voter fraud had kept Holleman from winning. Beginning in 1953, he served two terms in Stone County's legislative seat, retiring from that position in 1960. While in office, most considered him an extreme liberal on racial issues and he endured vigorous, hostile attacks on his reputation by both private citizens and state legislators. Former Gov. Ray Mabus appointed Blass to a vacancy on the Mississippi Supreme Court in 1989. He served through December 1990. He was defeated in his election bid by Justice Chuck McRae.

2002-09-07; 2002-09-08

Oral history.; Reuben V. Anderson was born in Jackson, Mississippi in 1942. As a student Anderson excelled academically and athletically, ultimately earning an athletic scholarship to Tougaloo College. At Tougaloo, Anderson met many people who influenced his life and career, including professor Ernst Borinski, and civil rights leader, Ed King. He was involved with the desegregation of the Jackson Public Library. He was the first African American to graduate from the University of Mississippi Law School. After graduation, he began practicing civil rights law. He was successful at overseeing the integration of the schools in Mississippi. Anderson was drafted during the conflict in Vietnam, but his service to the Legal Defense Fund helped him to earn a draft deferment to stay in the United States and practice law. Mayor Russell C. Davis appointed Anderson to serve as the first African American municipal court judge, and he was later appointed to Hinds County Court (by Gov. Cliff Finch) and 7th Circuit Court (by Gov. William Winter). He eventually came to the Mississippi Supreme Court, where he served from 1985-1990. After retiring from the Court, Anderson returned to private practice and resumed his involvement with the business sector. Judge Anderson is married to Phyllis Wright Anderson, and has three children.

2003-03-04

Oral history.; Interview conducted March 1, April 5, June 6, and June 9, 2003. James Lawton Robertson was born in Greenwood, Mississippi in July of 1940. He attended the University of Mississippi where he earned his bachelor's degree in history. He then moved on to pursue his Juris Doctorate at Harvard University. He was a prominent Mississippi Supreme Court Justice and presided over many civil cases in the state.

2003-03-01; 2003-04-05; 2003-06-09

Oral history.; Interview conducted March 1, April 5, June 6, and June 9, 2003. James Lawton Robertson was born in Greenwood, Mississippi in July of 1940. He attended the University of Mississippi where he earned his bachelor's degree in history. He then moved on to pursue his Juris Doctorate at Harvard University. He was a prominent Mississippi Supreme Court Justice and presided over many civil cases in the state.

2003-03-01; 2003-04-05; 2003-06-09

Oral history.; Interview conducted August 29, 2002. Robert P. Sugg was born in Eupora, Mississippi on February 21, 1916. He attended Mississippi State University and the Jackson School of Law, now the Mississippi College School of Law, and began practicing law in 1940. Sugg served as Webster County Prosecuting Attorney from 1949 to 1951, when he was elected Chancellor of the Fourteenth District which included Chickasaw, Clay, Lowndes, Noxubee, Oktibbeha and Webster Counties. He served in this capacity from January 1951 until September 1971. Governor John Bell Williams appointed Justice Sugg to the Mississippi Supreme Court in 1971 where he served until January 1983, having been re-elected without opposition. After he retired from the court, he continued to hear cases as a senior status judge until the age of eighty-three.

2002-08-29

Oral history.; Dan M. Lee was born in Petal, Mississippi, on April 19, 1926. He graduated from Petal High School in April 1944. Justice Lee served in the United States Naval Air Corps from April 1944 to June 1946. Lee attended pre-law at The University of Southern Mississippi, and he obtained his LLB degree in 1949 and his JD in 1970, both from the Mississippi College School of Law. Lee was admitted to the Mississippi Bar in 1948 and engaged in private practice with J. Ed Franklin from 1948 to 1954. From 1954 to 1971, he practiced law as a member of the firm of Lee, Moore and Countiss. Lee was elected and served as Hinds County Judge from 1971 to 1977 and as Circuit Judge of Hinds and Yazoo Counties from 1977 to 1982. In 1980, he was elected Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court for a term beginning in 1982 and was re-elected in 1988 for an eight-year term commencing January 1, 1990. He served as presiding justice from 1987 until December 1, 1995 when he became Chief Justice of the Mississippi Supreme Court.

2003-02-05; 2003-02-11; 2003-02-12

Oral history.; Interview conducted March 1, April 5, June 6, and June 9, 2003. James Lawton Robertson was born in Greenwood, Mississippi in July of 1940. He attended the University of Mississippi where he earned his bachelor's degree in history. He then moved on to pursue his Juris Doctorate at Harvard University. He was a prominent Mississippi Supreme Court Justice and presided over many civil cases in the state.

2003-03-01; 2003-04-05; 2003-06-09

Oral history.; Interview conducted on March 25, 2003 with Judge Fred L. Banks, Jr. (born 1942). In the late 1960s, Judge Banks began his law career by serving for the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. He was elected three times to the House of Representatives and served alternately as chair of the House Ethics committee, the House Judiciary Committee, and the Legislative Black Caucus. In February 1985, he was appointed judge of the Seventh Circuit Court District (Hinds and Yazoo Counties) and is projected to continue to serve until 2004 when his term is over.

2003-03-25

Oral history.; Interview conducted September 19, 2002; September 26, 2002; October 3, 2002; October 17, 2002; and October 31, 2002. Honorable James Lamar Roberts Jr. was born in the Robbs Community in Pontotoc County on June 8, 1945. He received his education from the Pontotoc public schools, Millsaps College (BA, 1967), Mississippi State University (MBA, 1968), and the University of Mississippi (JD, 1971). He is a graduate of the National Judicial College, Reno, Nevada, 1988. Roberts practiced law in Pontotoc from 1971 to 1984, while serving as county prosecuting attorney and youth court prosecutor from 1972 to 1984. From 1984 to 1988, Roberts was the Mississippi Commissioner of Public Safety, supervising the Mississippi Highway Safety Patrol, Mississippi Crime Laboratory, Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers Training Academy, Medical Examiner's Office, and Bureau of Narcotics. In 1988, Roberts was appointed Chancellor in the First Chancery District, where he was elected and re-elected for consecutive terms. In 1992, Roberts was elected to the Mississippi Supreme Court to commence in 1993, and he was Governor Fordice's first appointment to the Mississippi Supreme Court to complete the unexpired term of retiring Justice James Lawton Robertson. He served as the Supreme Court member of the Board of Governors of the Mississippi Judicial College and as a member of the Mississippi Bar Foundation Board of Governors.

2002-09-19; 2002-09-26; 2002-10-03; 2002-10-17; 2002-10-31

Oral history.; Interview conducted August 29, 2002. Robert P. Sugg was born in Eupora, Mississippi on February 21, 1916. He attended Mississippi State University and the Jackson School of Law, now the Mississippi College School of Law, and began practicing law in 1940. Sugg served as Webster County Prosecuting Attorney from 1949 to 1951, when he was elected Chancellor of the Fourteenth District which included Chickasaw, Clay, Lowndes, Noxubee, Oktibbeha and Webster Counties. He served in this capacity from January 1951 until September 1971. Governor John Bell Williams appointed Justice Sugg to the Mississippi Supreme Court in 1971 where he served until January 1983, having been re-elected without opposition. After he retired from the court, he continued to hear cases as a senior status judge until the age of eighty-three.

2002-08-29

Oral history.; Interview conducted September 19, 2002; September 26, 2002; October 3, 2002; October 17, 2002; and October 31, 2002. Honorable James Lamar Roberts Jr. was born in the Robbs Community in Pontotoc County on June 8, 1945. He received his education from the Pontotoc public schools, Millsaps College (BA, 1967), Mississippi State University (MBA, 1968), and the University of Mississippi (JD, 1971). He is a graduate of the National Judicial College, Reno, Nevada, 1988. Roberts practiced law in Pontotoc from 1971 to 1984, while serving as county prosecuting attorney and youth court prosecutor from 1972 to 1984. From 1984 to 1988, Roberts was the Mississippi Commissioner of Public Safety, supervising the Mississippi Highway Safety Patrol, Mississippi Crime Laboratory, Mississippi Law Enforcement Officers Training Academy, Medical Examiner's Office, and Bureau of Narcotics. In 1988, Roberts was appointed Chancellor in the First Chancery District, where he was elected and re-elected for consecutive terms. In 1992, Roberts was elected to the Mississippi Supreme Court to commence in 1993, and he was Governor Fordice's first appointment to the Mississippi Supreme Court to complete the unexpired term of retiring Justice James Lawton Robertson. He served as the Supreme Court member of the Board of Governors of the Mississippi Judicial College and as a member of the Mississippi Bar Foundation Board of Governors.

2002-09-19; 2002-09-26; 2002-10-03; 2002-10-17; 2002-10-31

Oral history.; Born in Clinton, Mississippi in 1917, both of William Joel Blass' parents were teachers and his father was also a Baptist minister. Blass attended East Mississippi Junior College and Pearl River Junior College. He earned his AB and LLB degrees from Louisiana State University. As a lawyer in 1952, he successfully prosecuted the Boyce Holleman case by proving that voter fraud had kept Holleman from winning. Beginning in 1953, he served two terms in Stone County's legislative seat, retiring from that position in 1960. While in office, most considered him an extreme liberal on racial issues and he endured vigorous, hostile attacks on his reputation by both private citizens and state legislators. Former Gov. Ray Mabus appointed Blass to a vacancy on the Mississippi Supreme Court in 1989. He served through December 1990. He was defeated in his election bid by Justice Chuck McRae.

2002-09-07; 2002-09-08

Loading indicator
Powered by Preservica
© Copyright 2024