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Oral history.; David Caldwell was born in Lavaca, Arkansas where he stayed and worked on his uncle's farm, and attended segregated schools. He dropped out of school and worked in a number of jobs, including for a furrier. Caldwell joined the military and served in Japan during and after World War II. He also served in Korea and Germany. After being discharged from the Army, he came to Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he first experienced racist intimidation. He became involved with the civil rights workers in Holly Springs during the summer of 1964.

2003-01-16

Oral history.; David Caldwell was born in Lavaca, Arkansas where he stayed and worked on his uncle's farm, and attended segregated schools. He dropped out of school and worked in a number of jobs, including for a furrier. Caldwell joined the military and served in Japan during and after World War II. He also served in Korea and Germany. After being discharged from the Army, he came to Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he first experienced racist intimidation. He became involved with the civil rights workers in Holly Springs during the summer of 1964.

2003-01-16

Oral history.; David Caldwell was born in Lavaca, Arkansas where he stayed and worked on his uncle's farm, and attended segregated schools. He dropped out of school and worked in a number of jobs, including for a furrier. Caldwell joined the military and served in Japan during and after World War II. He also served in Korea and Germany. After being discharged from the Army, he came to Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he first experienced racist intimidation. He became involved with the civil rights workers in Holly Springs during the summer of 1964.

2003-01-16

Oral history.; David Caldwell was born in Lavaca, Arkansas where he stayed and worked on his uncle's farm, and attended segregated schools. He dropped out of school and worked in a number of jobs, including for a furrier. Caldwell joined the military and served in Japan during and after World War II. He also served in Korea and Germany. After being discharged from the Army, he came to Holly Springs, Mississippi, where he first experienced racist intimidation. He became involved with the civil rights workers in Holly Springs during the summer of 1964.

2003-01-16

Oral history.; Ron Carver was born in 1946 in Boston and was in high school when he became aware of the struggle for civil rights going on in Mississippi. After graduation, he decided to get involved and he volunteered as an assistant to Julian Bond in the SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) office in Atlanta, Georgia. At the end of the summer, he decided to go to Mississippi. Carver canvassed from door to door in black communities, working primarily in North Mississippi, assisting black citizens in registering to vote, organizing mass meetings, identifying issues deemed important by local people, recruiting for the Freedom Democratic Party, taking part in Freedom Days, and other civil rights activities. Carver left Mississippi to matriculate as a freshman at Columbia University.

2001-04-26

Oral history.; Ron Carver was born in 1946 in Boston and was in high school when he became aware of the struggle for civil rights going on in Mississippi. After graduation, he decided to get involved and he volunteered as an assistant to Julian Bond in the SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) office in Atlanta, Georgia. At the end of the summer, he decided to go to Mississippi. Carver canvassed from door to door in black communities, working primarily in North Mississippi, assisting black citizens in registering to vote, organizing mass meetings, identifying issues deemed important by local people, recruiting for the Freedom Democratic Party, taking part in Freedom Days, and other civil rights activities. Carver left Mississippi to matriculate as a freshman at Columbia University.

2001-04-26

Oral history.; Ron Carver was born in 1946 in Boston and was in high school when he became aware of the struggle for civil rights going on in Mississippi. After graduation, he decided to get involved and he volunteered as an assistant to Julian Bond in the SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) office in Atlanta, Georgia. At the end of the summer, he decided to go to Mississippi. Carver canvassed from door to door in black communities, working primarily in North Mississippi, assisting black citizens in registering to vote, organizing mass meetings, identifying issues deemed important by local people, recruiting for the Freedom Democratic Party, taking part in Freedom Days, and other civil rights activities. Carver left Mississippi to matriculate as a freshman at Columbia University.

2001-04-26

Oral history.; Ron Carver was born in 1946 in Boston and was in high school when he became aware of the struggle for civil rights going on in Mississippi. After graduation, he decided to get involved and he volunteered as an assistant to Julian Bond in the SNCC (Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee) office in Atlanta, Georgia. At the end of the summer, he decided to go to Mississippi. Carver canvassed from door to door in black communities, working primarily in North Mississippi, assisting black citizens in registering to vote, organizing mass meetings, identifying issues deemed important by local people, recruiting for the Freedom Democratic Party, taking part in Freedom Days, and other civil rights activities. Carver left Mississippi to matriculate as a freshman at Columbia University.

2001-04-26

Oral history.; Transcript of interview conducted December 14, 1995 in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, at Cobb's home. She discusses growing up during the civil rights movement, memories of Freedom Summer, and the battle over school integration. She also discusses her introduction to and continued involvement in civil rights activism.

1995-12-14

Oral history.; Interview conducted December 14, 1995 in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, at Cobb's home. She discusses growing up during the civil rights movement, memories of Freedom Summer, and the battle over school integration. She also discusses her introduction to and continued involvement in civil rights activism.

1995-12-14

Oral history.; Interview conducted December 14, 1995 in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, at Cobb's home. She discusses growing up during the civil rights movement, memories of Freedom Summer, and the battle over school integration. She also discusses her introduction to and continued involvement in civil rights activism.

1995-12-14

Oral history.; Interview conducted December 14, 1995 in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, at Cobb's home. She discusses growing up during the civil rights movement, memories of Freedom Summer, and the battle over school integration. She also discusses her introduction to and continued involvement in civil rights activism.

1995-12-14

Oral history.; Interview conducted December 14, 1995 in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, at Cobb's home. She discusses growing up during the civil rights movement, memories of Freedom Summer, and the battle over school integration. She also discusses her introduction to and continued involvement in civil rights activism.

1995-12-14

Oral history.; Interview conducted December 14, 1995 in Blue Mountain, Mississippi, at Cobb's home. She discusses growing up during the civil rights movement, memories of Freedom Summer, and the battle over school integration. She also discusses her introduction to and continued involvement in civil rights activism.

1995-12-14

Oral history.; Interview conducted October 17, 2001 with Chude Pamela Allen in San Francisco, California. Chude Pamela Allen was born into an Episcopal family in eastern Pennsylvania. Though her parents were republicans, their Christian ideology contributed to AllenΓÇÖs liberal foundation, as did exposure to children from more progressive families in school. Allen went to Spellman College, where she became politically active in her freshman year, and was recruited to volunteer for Freedom Summer by SNCC. She trained in Oxford, OH before being sent to Holly Springs, MS in 1964, where Allen became a teacher at the Freedom school in Holly Springs. During the summer, Allen encountered both racial violence and sexism. After Freedom Summer, Allen continued her political activism as part of the secular Left. She became active in the womenΓÇÖs liberation movement in the mid-1960s and moved to San Francisco, CA in 1968 where she would organize womenΓÇÖs liberation groups. Allen worked for The Guardian and continued her activism throughout the 1970s. Despite a decline in her political activity in the early 80s, Allen began writing about her experiences as a volunteer during Civil Rights Movement. She helped organize the 25th anniversary reunion for Freedom Summer in 1989, as well as the 30th anniversary reunion in 1994. Allen has since then worked to help volunteers of the Movement cope with any trauma they may have endured.

2001-10-17

Oral history.; Interview conducted October 17, 2001 with Chude Pamela Allen in San Francisco, California. Chude Pamela Allen was born into an Episcopal family in eastern Pennsylvania. Though her parents were republicans, their Christian ideology contributed to Allen's liberal foundation, as did exposure to children from more progressive families in school. Allen went to Spellman College, where she became politically active in her freshman year, and was recruited to volunteer for Freedom Summer by SNCC. She trained in Oxford, OH before being sent to Holly Springs, MS in 1964, where Allen became a teacher at the Freedom school in Holly Springs. During the summer, Allen encountered both racial violence and sexism. After Freedom Summer, Allen continued her political activism as part of the secular Left. She became active in the women's liberation movement in the mid-1960s and moved to San Francisco, CA in 1968 where she would organize women's liberation groups. Allen worked for The Guardian and continued her activism throughout the 1970s. Despite a decline in her political activity in the early 80s, Allen began writing about her experiences as a volunteer during Civil Rights Movement. She helped organize the 25th anniversary reunion for Freedom Summer in 1989, as well as the 30th anniversary reunion in 1994. Allen has since then worked to help volunteers of the Movement cope with any trauma they may have endured.

2001-10-17

Oral history.; Recording log for interview conducted October 17, 2001 with Chude Pamela Allen in San Francisco, California. Chude Pamela Allen was born into an Episcopal family in eastern Pennsylvania. Though her parents were republicans, their Christian ideology contributed to Allen's liberal foundation, as did exposure to children from more progressive families in school. Allen went to Spellman College, where she became politically active in her freshman year, and was recruited to volunteer for Freedom Summer by SNCC. She trained in Oxford, OH before being sent to Holly Springs, MS in 1964, where Allen became a teacher at the Freedom school in Holly Springs. During the summer, Allen encountered both racial violence and sexism. After Freedom Summer, Allen continued her political activism as part of the secular Left. She became active in the women's liberation movement in the mid-1960s and moved to San Francisco, CA in 1968 where she would organize women's liberation groups. Allen worked for The Guardian and continued her activism throughout the 1970s. Despite a decline in her political activity in the early 80s, Allen began writing about her experiences as a volunteer during Civil Rights Movement. She helped organize the 25th anniversary reunion for Freedom Summer in 1989, as well as the 30th anniversary reunion in 1994. Allen has since then worked to help volunteers of the Movement cope with any trauma they may have endured.

2001-10-17

Oral history.; Interview conducted October 17, 2001 with Chude Pamela Allen in San Francisco, California. Chude Pamela Allen was born into an Episcopal family in eastern Pennsylvania. Though her parents were republicans, their Christian ideology contributed to Allen's liberal foundation, as did exposure to children from more progressive families in school. Allen went to Spellman College, where she became politically active in her freshman year, and was recruited to volunteer for Freedom Summer by SNCC. She trained in Oxford, OH before being sent to Holly Springs, MS in 1964, where Allen became a teacher at the Freedom school in Holly Springs. During the summer, Allen encountered both racial violence and sexism. After Freedom Summer, Allen continued her political activism as part of the secular Left. She became active in the women's liberation movement in the mid-1960s and moved to San Francisco, CA in 1968 where she would organize women's liberation groups. Allen worked for The Guardian and continued her activism throughout the 1970s. Despite a decline in her political activity in the early 80s, Allen began writing about her experiences as a volunteer during Civil Rights Movement. She helped organize the 25th anniversary reunion for Freedom Summer in 1989, as well as the 30th anniversary reunion in 1994. Allen has since then worked to help volunteers of the Movement cope with any trauma they may have endured.

2001-10-17

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