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From the Miller (Michael J.) Civil Rights Collection. Memo to the Jackson COFO office about the re-organization of a COFO office in Marks, Mississippi.

3 February 1964

Oral history.; Transcript of interview conducted on December 3, 1971 with the Honorable Charles Evers at his office in Fayette, Mississippi. Evers was born on September 11, 1922 in Decatur, Mississippi. In 1950, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in social science. Evers served in World War II and the Korean War. In June of 1963, when his brother Medgar Evers was murdered, Evers moved back to Mississippi to carry on his brother's civil rights work. After working for five years at voter registration and related civil rights activities, Evers entered into Mississippi politics in 1968. He became a candidate for United States Representative from Mississippi's third Congressional district but lost the election. Evers was elected Mississippi's Democratic National Committeeman. In 1969, he was elected mayor of the town of Fayette, Mississippi, and in 1971 was defeated by Bill Waller in his bid to become Mississippi's first black governor.

1971-12-03

Oral history.; Interview conducted on December 3, 1971 with the Honorable Charles Evers at his office in Fayette, Mississippi. Evers was born on September 11, 1922 in Decatur, Mississippi. In 1950, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in social science. Evers served in World War II and the Korean War. In June of 1963, when his brother Medgar Evers was murdered, Evers moved back to Mississippi to carry on his brother's civil rights work. After working for five years at voter registration and related civil rights activities, Evers entered into Mississippi politics in 1968. He became a candidate for United States Representative from Mississippi's third Congressional district but lost the election. Evers was elected Mississippi's Democratic National Committeeman. In 1969, he was elected mayor of the town of Fayette, Mississippi, and in 1971 was defeated by Bill Waller in his bid to become Mississippi's first black governor.

1971-12-03

Oral history.; Interview conducted on December 3, 1971 with the Honorable Charles Evers at his office in Fayette, Mississippi. Evers was born on September 11, 1922 in Decatur, Mississippi. In 1950, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in social science. Evers served in World War II and the Korean War. In June of 1963, when his brother Medgar Evers was murdered, Evers moved back to Mississippi to carry on his brother's civil rights work. After working for five years at voter registration and related civil rights activities, Evers entered into Mississippi politics in 1968. He became a candidate for United States Representative from Mississippi's third Congressional district but lost the election. Evers was elected Mississippi's Democratic National Committeeman. In 1969, he was elected mayor of the town of Fayette, Mississippi, and in 1971 was defeated by Bill Waller in his bid to become Mississippi's first black governor.

1971-12-03

Oral history.; Interview conducted on December 3, 1971 with the Honorable Charles Evers at his office in Fayette, Mississippi. Evers was born on September 11, 1922 in Decatur, Mississippi. In 1950, he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in social science. Evers served in World War II and the Korean War. In June of 1963, when his brother Medgar Evers was murdered, Evers moved back to Mississippi to carry on his brother's civil rights work. After working for five years at voter registration and related civil rights activities, Evers entered into Mississippi politics in 1968. He became a candidate for United States Representative from Mississippi's third Congressional district but lost the election. Evers was elected Mississippi's Democratic National Committeeman. In 1969, he was elected mayor of the town of Fayette, Mississippi, and in 1971 was defeated by Bill Waller in his bid to become Mississippi's first black governor.

1971-12-03

Oral history.; Robert Smith was born on December 20, 1937 in Terry, Mississippi. He grew up on a farm, and his father was a livestock dealer. Smith began high school at age eleven. Upon graduation, he went on to graduate first from Tougaloo College and later Howard University, where he earned his M.D. In 1961, Smith was one of twelve Mississippi physicians drafted due to the Berlin Crisis. At that time, Smith became active in the Civil Rights movement. In 1963, Smith and others formed the Medical Committee for Civil Rights and picketed the American Medical Association to bring attention to segregated health care and racial disparities in morbidity. In 1964, he contributed to the creation of the southern arm of the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR), which sponsored doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, and other members of the allied health disciplines to come to Mississippi for Freedom Summer. In 1965, he helped obtain Office of Equal Opportunity funds to set up a model healthcare clinic in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, to serve seventeen counties by providing health, environmental, social, and legal services to those who needed it.

2000-04-08

Oral history.; Robert Smith was born on December 20, 1937 in Terry, Mississippi. He grew up on a farm, and his father was a livestock dealer. Smith began high school at age eleven. Upon graduation, he went on to graduate first from Tougaloo College and later Howard University, where he earned his M.D. In 1961, Smith was one of twelve Mississippi physicians drafted due to the Berlin Crisis. At that time, Smith became active in the Civil Rights movement. In 1963, Smith and others formed the Medical Committee for Civil Rights and picketed the American Medical Association to bring attention to segregated health care and racial disparities in morbidity. In 1964, he contributed to the creation of the southern arm of the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR), which sponsored doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, and other members of the allied health disciplines to come to Mississippi for Freedom Summer. In 1965, he helped obtain Office of Equal Opportunity funds to set up a model healthcare clinic in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, to serve seventeen counties by providing health, environmental, social, and legal services to those who needed it.

2000-04-08

Oral history.; Robert Smith was born on December 20, 1937 in Terry, Mississippi. He grew up on a farm, and his father was a livestock dealer. Smith began high school at age eleven. Upon graduation, he went on to graduate first from Tougaloo College and later Howard University, where he earned his M.D. In 1961, Smith was one of twelve Mississippi physicians drafted due to the Berlin Crisis. At that time, Smith became active in the Civil Rights movement. In 1963, Smith and others formed the Medical Committee for Civil Rights and picketed the American Medical Association to bring attention to segregated health care and racial disparities in morbidity. In 1964, he contributed to the creation of the southern arm of the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR), which sponsored doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, and other members of the allied health disciplines to come to Mississippi for Freedom Summer. In 1965, he helped obtain Office of Equal Opportunity funds to set up a model healthcare clinic in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, to serve seventeen counties by providing health, environmental, social, and legal services to those who needed it.

2000-04-08

Oral history.; Robert Smith was born on December 20, 1937 in Terry, Mississippi. He grew up on a farm, and his father was a livestock dealer. Smith began high school at age eleven. Upon graduation, he went on to graduate first from Tougaloo College and later Howard University, where he earned his M.D. In 1961, Smith was one of twelve Mississippi physicians drafted due to the Berlin Crisis. At that time, Smith became active in the Civil Rights movement. In 1963, Smith and others formed the Medical Committee for Civil Rights and picketed the American Medical Association to bring attention to segregated health care and racial disparities in morbidity. In 1964, he contributed to the creation of the southern arm of the Medical Committee for Human Rights (MCHR), which sponsored doctors, nurses, social workers, psychologists, and other members of the allied health disciplines to come to Mississippi for Freedom Summer. In 1965, he helped obtain Office of Equal Opportunity funds to set up a model healthcare clinic in Mound Bayou, Mississippi, to serve seventeen counties by providing health, environmental, social, and legal services to those who needed it.

2000-04-08

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