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From the Mississippiana and Rare Books Collection. A cookbook compiled by the Ladies Aide Society, M.E. Church, New Augusta, Mississippi. The book contains recipes for soups, meats, vegetables, breads, eggs, pastry and pies, cakes, desserts, and beverages.

1977

Oral history.; Interview conducted on August 17, 1977 with Mrs. Betty Carter at her home in Greenville, Mississippi. Carter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She attended Newcomb College where she met her husband, Hodding Carter. Together they established two newspapers and purchased the third. In their first newspaper, The Courier, established in Hammond, Louisiana, the Carters were known for opposing Huey P. Long. Opposing Long led to the downfall of the Carters' first newspaper and their move out of Louisiana. Betty Carter served as the first advertising manager of their second newspaper, The Delta Star. The Carters eventually bought out the other local paper in Greenville, Mississippi to create the Delta Democrat Times. During the civil rights movement in the South, their paper became a voice of moderation in the South. This policy forced Carter and her husband to live under threats and in a state of tension for years.

1977-08-17

Oral history.; Interview conducted on August 17, 1977 with Mrs. Betty Carter at her home in Greenville, Mississippi. Carter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She attended Newcomb College where she met her husband, Hodding Carter. Together they established two newspapers and purchased the third. In their first newspaper, The Courier, established in Hammond, Louisiana, the Carters were known for opposing Huey P. Long. Opposing Long led to the downfall of the Carters' first newspaper and their move out of Louisiana. Betty Carter served as the first advertising manager of their second newspaper, The Delta Star. The Carters eventually bought out the other local paper in Greenville, Mississippi to create the Delta Democrat Times. During the civil rights movement in the South, their paper became a voice of moderation in the South. This policy forced Carter and her husband to live under threats and in a state of tension for years.

1977-08-17

Oral history.; Transcript of interview conducted on August 17, 1977 with Mrs. Betty Carter at her home in Greenville, Mississippi. Carter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She attended Newcomb College where she met her husband, Hodding Carter. Together they established two newspapers and purchased the third. In their first newspaper, The Courier, established in Hammond, Louisiana, the Carters were known for opposing Huey P. Long. Opposing Long led to the downfall of the Carters' first newspaper and their move out of Louisiana. Betty Carter served as the first advertising manager of their second newspaper, The Delta Star. The Carters eventually bought out the other local paper in Greenville, Mississippi to create the Delta Democrat Times. During the civil rights movement in the South, their paper became a voice of moderation in the South. This policy forced Carter and her husband to live under threats and in a state of tension for years.

1977-08-17

Oral history.; Interview conducted on August 17, 1977 with Mrs. Betty Carter at her home in Greenville, Mississippi. Carter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She attended Newcomb College where she met her husband, Hodding Carter. Together they established two newspapers and purchased the third. In their first newspaper, The Courier, established in Hammond, Louisiana, the Carters were known for opposing Huey P. Long. Opposing Long led to the downfall of the Carters' first newspaper and their move out of Louisiana. Betty Carter served as the first advertising manager of their second newspaper, The Delta Star. The Carters eventually bought out the other local paper in Greenville, Mississippi to create the Delta Democrat Times. During the civil rights movement in the South, their paper became a voice of moderation in the South. This policy forced Carter and her husband to live under threats and in a state of tension for years.

1977-08-17

Oral history.; Interview conducted on August 17, 1977 with Mrs. Betty Carter at her home in Greenville, Mississippi. Carter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She attended Newcomb College where she met her husband, Hodding Carter. Together they established two newspapers and purchased the third. In their first newspaper, The Courier, established in Hammond, Louisiana, the Carters were known for opposing Huey P. Long. Opposing Long led to the downfall of the Carters' first newspaper and their move out of Louisiana. Betty Carter served as the first advertising manager of their second newspaper, The Delta Star. The Carters eventually bought out the other local paper in Greenville, Mississippi to create the Delta Democrat Times. During the civil rights movement in the South, their paper became a voice of moderation in the South. This policy forced Carter and her husband to live under threats and in a state of tension for years.

1977-08-17

Oral history.; Interview conducted on August 17, 1977 with Mrs. Betty Carter at her home in Greenville, Mississippi. Carter was born in New Orleans, Louisiana. She attended Newcomb College where she met her husband, Hodding Carter. Together they established two newspapers and purchased the third. In their first newspaper, The Courier, established in Hammond, Louisiana, the Carters were known for opposing Huey P. Long. Opposing Long led to the downfall of the Carters' first newspaper and their move out of Louisiana. Betty Carter served as the first advertising manager of their second newspaper, The Delta Star. The Carters eventually bought out the other local paper in Greenville, Mississippi to create the Delta Democrat Times. During the civil rights movement in the South, their paper became a voice of moderation in the South. This policy forced Carter and her husband to live under threats and in a state of tension for years.

1977-08-17

From the AAEC Editorial Cartoon Collection; Cartoon by Jon Kennedy. Labor leader George Meany is smoking a cigar that has exploded in his face. The smoke from the exploding cigar is labeled "Limited spending on unemployment." The end of the exploded cigar has dropped to an ash tray and is labeled "Rejection of Dunlop." The label on a box of cigars near Meany reads, "Jimmy Carter's Coronas."

13 January 1977

From the AAEC Editorial Cartoon Collection. Cartoon by Reg Manning. A dashed line marks the border between the U.S. and Mexico. On the U.S. side, a thug labeled "Crime in the U.S." holds up a man at gun point. On the Mexico side, a man labeled "Governor of Baja California, Mexico" tells a man labeled "American tourists, "You're as safe here as in your own home town." The cartoon caption reads, "Small comfort."

27 January 1977

From the University of Southern Mississippi Art Museum collection. Colorful marker on paper abstract drawing, by Franz Schilke.

1977

From the University of Southern Mississippi Art Museum collection. Colorful marker on paper abstract drawing, by Franz Schilke.

1977

From the University of Southern Mississippi Art Museum collection. Spray paint on paper abstract in red and blue, by Franz Schilke. Schilke was an artist in residence at USM.

1977

USM Army ROTC Golden Eagle football run to MS State program.

22 October 1977

The signing of an agreement under which students at William Carey College may enroll in ROTC at USM.

1977

Newspaper article by J.R. Parrish.

16 January 1977

From the AAEC Editorial Cartoon Collection. Cartoon by Eldon Pletcher. Uncle Sam, with "Americans in Uganda" on his vest, is suspended in the air with his hands up. Ugandan president Idi Amin points a handgun at Uncle Sam and says, "...Not until Amin says you may come down!"

01 March 1977

From the AAEC Editorial Cartoon Collection. Cartoon by Eldon Pletcher. Ernest Morial and New Orleans city councilman Joseph V. DiRosa are dressed as train conductors. Candidates for mayor of New Orleans, they are arguing beside the tracks where stands the Amtrak train named "City of New Orleans." Behind them is the city skyline. The cartoon caption reads, "I can run it a helluva lot better than you!"

22 October 1977

From the AAEC Editorial Cartoon Collection. Cartoon by Eldon Pletcher. Louisiana governor Edwin Edwards and a second man [commissioner of administration Charles Roemer?] are on a large mainframe computer they are using as a raft. Sharks circle the computer and the men. Their dorsal fins are labeled, "$174,000 false interest...$$$$ sales taxes...$520,000 'lost' discount." Edwards says, "Sure hope you can compute a solution this time, Charlie! [Note on the date: Manuscript entry in the bottom border is Wed. May 4. During Edward's terms as governor, May 4 was on Wednesday during 1977 and 1983.]

04 May 1977

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